Understanding profits.
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Understanding profits. by Claude Everett Robinson

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Published by Van Nostrand in Princeton, N.J .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Profit -- United States.,
  • Profit

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliography.

SeriesThe Library of American capitalism
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC110.P7 R6
The Physical Object
Pagination517 p.
Number of Pages517
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5828181M
LC Control Number61016279
OCLC/WorldCa341701

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